Biological circuits for synthetic biology
Berkeley Lab News Center | 5.27.2011

Synthetic biologists have been using RNA regulatory mechanisms to program genetic networks in cells to achieve specific results. However, to date these programming efforts have required proteins to propagate RNA regulatory signals. This can pose problems because one of the primary goals of synthetic biology is to create families of standard genetic parts that can be combined to create biological circuits with behaviors that are to some extent predictable. "We're now able to eliminate the protein requirement and directly propagate regulatory signals as RNA molecules," says SBI Director Adam Arkin. More >

Experts look at future of synbio in SBI's debut forum
4.26.2011

What can society expect from synthetic biology? Academic and industry leaders probed this question at the inaugural forum of the Synthetic Biology Institute, on April 25, 2011 at UC Berkeley. Their common theme: Synthetic biology faces serious hurdles and is not without risk; it could also spark revolutionary changes that could fuel new industry and lead to solutions to many of society’s biggest challenges. Read more >

UC Berkeley launches SBI, with Agilent as first Industry Member
4.19.2011

An alliance of top researchers has formed the UC Berkeley Synthetic Biology Institute (SBI), advancing efforts to engineer cells and biological systems in ways that promise to transform technology in health and medicine, energy, the environment, new materials, and a host of other critical arenas. Aiming to create “an industrial revolution in biological engineering,” SBI announced a lively collaboration with its first Industry Member, Agilent Technologies Inc., a leader in measurement technologies and products to advance science and engineering research. Read more >

Berkeley launches first undergrad concentration in synthetic biology
UC Berkeley Department of Bioengineering | Spring 2011

The multidisciplinary undergraduate major in bioengineering at UC Berkeley has added curriculum for a concentration in synthetic biology to its list undergraduate options, one of the first such academic offerings for  undergraduates. More >

Biological circuits for synthetic biology
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | May 27, 2011

...Synthetic biologists have been using RNA regulatory mechanisms to program genetic networks in cells to achieve specific results. However, to date these programming efforts have required proteins to propagate RNA regulatory signals. This can pose problems because one of the primary goals of synthetic biology is to create families of standard genetic parts that can be combined to create biological circuits with behaviors that are to some extent predictable. Proteins can be difficult to design and predict. They also add a layer of complexity to biological circuits that can delay and slow the dynamics of the circuit's responses.

"We're now able to eliminate the protein requirement and directly propagate regulatory signals as RNA molecules," Arkin says.More

Synthetic Biology Institute partners with Agilent Technologies
The Daily Californian, April 26, 2011

In an effort to transfer research results produced in lab settings to technologies that can be applied in the real world, the Synthetic Biology Institute - which began in 2008 as an idea developed by a group of UC Berkeley researchers - announced April 19 its partnership with its first industrial member, Agilent Technologies Inc. More

Agilent, UC Berkeley in synthetic biology deal
BioCentury Extra, April 25, 2011

Agilent Technologies Inc. (NYSE:A) will provide funding and technology to the newly formed Synthetic Biology Institute at the University of California, Berkeley. The institute is using synthetic biology to engineer cells and biological systems for several applications, including medical, energy, agricultural and environmental uses. The institute will have access to Agilent's oligo library synthesis technology. UC Berkeley will own all the patent rights to technology developed at the institute, while Agilent has the option to negotiate licenses to the IP. Financial details were not disclosed.

SBI and JBEI to Host Aug. 29-31 International Workshop on “Bio-Based Future”

The Synthetic Biology Institute (SBI) and Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) at UC Berkeley will join with the University of Copenhagen for a three-day workshop, from August 29 through August 31, to examine the future of biology-based technologies.

The event, titled “A Bio-Based Future” will be held on the UC Berkeley campus at the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS). It will feature more than two dozen leading scientists presenting their pioneering work in the emerging field of synthetic biology. The workshop will focus on five key themes: “Plants of the Future,” “Cell-based and Biomimetic Production Systems,” “Nano-Bio-Technology: Sensors, Receptors and Drugs,” “Biological Membranes” and “Foundational Technologies.” Each theme will be introduced by a keynote speaker, followed by plenary lectures.

UC Berkeley scientist Jay Keasling will deliver the introductory lecture, “The Bio-Based Society.” Also speaking at the workshop will be researchers from UC Berkeley, the University of Copenhagen, Technical University of Denmark, Stanford University, Duke University, the University of British Columbia, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories.

This is the third in an annual series of meetings organized by UC Berkeley and the University of Copenhagen to showcase new developments in synthetic biology. The first was held in 2009 at UC Berkeley, and the 2010 event was held in Copenhagen. The event is sponsored by The Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation.

Read the post-event recap here!

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